About e-Colloquia

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Welcome to e-Colloquia

 

e-Colloquia is intended to offer a friendly but scholarly forum for the discussion of general issues pertaining to sixteenth-century English literature, philosophy, and theology. At least once a year, perhaps more often, we shall publish a chapter-length “Leader” written by an established expert in the field, which will raise general points of interest and concern to scholars working across the disciplinary boundaries covered by the remit of the journal. Before publication, the Leader is sent to other experts for general comment, or, “Reflection.” These shorter responses are then presented to the author of the leader for consideration and response, and then all the items are published on the internet with an invitation for others interested in the topic to contribute their own remarks, which will be posted up on the internet as and as long as they are sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The collaborative work is very much meant to create a space where scholars, especially younger scholars at the start of their career, can feel at ease discussing topics which are important to them, knowing that their views will be taken seriously but also treated in a spirit of generosity and comradeship – in a word: humaniter.

If you would like to participate directly in the discussion of this issue's topic, please send in a comment of no more than 1500 words to either of the editors by means of an e-mail attachment. If you would like to propose a topic for discussion, maybe even a leader, then please get in touch with us. We also intend soon to start publishing book reviews, so if you would like to be considered as a reviewer, do let us know.

 

1. Contents of an Issue

  • The Leading Article on a given topic by a chosen author:

Features of the Leader are the following:

  • The final article should consist of 6000-8000 words;

  • the footnotes and bibliography should follow the MLA format;

  • The paper should deal with its topic in a way that is accessible for both scholars and audience who are not necessarily specialists of the narrower field of the paper. To put it otherwise, the treatment of the theme of the paper should not aim at experts of the field, but rather at scholars working in other areas of sixteenth-century English literary, philosophical, and theological studies as well.

  • 3 - 4 Reflections on the position held by the leading article:

A Reflection is not meant to be a critique of the leader, but rather a short essay picking up and developing any points you find interesting.  But it is not designed as a kind of bear-baiting. Ideally, leader and reflections should work together to show good friendly scholarship in action — a dialogue in the best spirit of civil conversation.  Thus, Reflector should choose a point or points and focus on elaborating them in a way that develops the original essay in new directions, and offers encouragement to other writers to do the same when the forum is opened to the public. We hope that postgraduates and starting scholars will thus be encouraged to add their own views and comments in the knowledge that they are entering a friendly forum, not a battlefield.

The features of the Reflection are the following:

  • Your Reflection should consist of 2500-3000 words;

  • footnotes and bibliography should follow the MLA format;

  • The paper should deal with its topic in a way that is accessible for both scholars and audience who are not necessarily specialists of the narrower field of the paper. To put it otherwise, the treatment of the theme of the paper should not aim at experts of the given specific field, but rather at scholars working in other areas of sixteenth-century English literary, philosophical, and theological studies as well.

  • a Response on the reflections by the author of the original article;

  • Book reviews;

  • Shorter Reflections on the side of either the leading article or the rest;

  • a continuously enlarged collection of Useful Links;

  • every year a Select Bibliography pertaining to the focus of the journal with short descriptions: forming thus a database.

 

2. Editorial Board

General Editors:

Michael Pincombe (University of Newcastle), Zsolt Almási (Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Hungary)

Consultant Editors:

Teresa Bela (Kraków), Paul Richard Blum (Loyola College in Maryland), Dermot Cavanagh (University of Northumbria), Kevin Eastell (Angers, France), Tibor Fabiny (PPCU, Hungary), Peter Happé (Southampton), Andrew Hiscock (Bangor), Peter D. Holland (University of Notre Dame), John N. King (Ohio), Efterpi Mitsi (Athens), Wolfgang Müller (Jena), Károly Pintér (PPCU, Hungary), Jennifer Richards (University of Newcastle), Cathy Shrank (University of Aberdeen), and Péter Benedek Tóta (PPCU, Hungary).

 

3. Publisher:

Pázmány University Electronic Press (PUEP)

Publisher: Pázmány University Electronic Press - Budapest, ISSN 1785-6515
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